Research Article


DOI :10.26650/SJ.2020.40.2.0054   IUP :10.26650/SJ.2020.40.2.0054    Full Text (PDF)

Dragon’s Abacus: Developmentalist Strategy and EconomicSocial Consequences of Chinese Companies in Africa

Jun YanChong ZhangTingting Li

This study attempts to find out why Chinese companies boosted African economy through investment there while received negation evaluations generally. Different from the three existing views, “neocolonialism”, “state capitalism” and “continuation of inefficient aiding policies”, in this paper, a new explanation based on developmentalist strategy and group interaction was proposed: the developmentalist strategy formed domestically by Chinese companies effectively resolved the benefit disagreement in interaction with different social groups, however, it no longer applied in a cross-cultural context, and thus triggered complicated “economic-social” consequences and negative evaluations.


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APA

Yan, J., Zhang, C., & Li, T. (2020). Dragon’s Abacus: Developmentalist Strategy and EconomicSocial Consequences of Chinese Companies in Africa. İstanbul University Journal of Sociology, 40(2), 745-766. https://doi.org/10.26650/SJ.2020.40.2.0054


AMA

Yan J, Zhang C, Li T. Dragon’s Abacus: Developmentalist Strategy and EconomicSocial Consequences of Chinese Companies in Africa. İstanbul University Journal of Sociology. 2020;40(2):745-766. https://doi.org/10.26650/SJ.2020.40.2.0054


ABNT

Yan, J.; Zhang, C.; Li, T. Dragon’s Abacus: Developmentalist Strategy and EconomicSocial Consequences of Chinese Companies in Africa. İstanbul University Journal of Sociology, [Publisher Location], v. 40, n. 2, p. 745-766, 2020.


Chicago: Author-Date Style

Yan, Jun, and Chong Zhang and Tingting Li. 2020. “Dragon’s Abacus: Developmentalist Strategy and EconomicSocial Consequences of Chinese Companies in Africa.” İstanbul University Journal of Sociology 40, no. 2: 745-766. https://doi.org/10.26650/SJ.2020.40.2.0054


Chicago: Humanities Style

Yan, Jun, and Chong Zhang and Tingting Li. Dragon’s Abacus: Developmentalist Strategy and EconomicSocial Consequences of Chinese Companies in Africa.” İstanbul University Journal of Sociology 40, no. 2 (Jul. 2022): 745-766. https://doi.org/10.26650/SJ.2020.40.2.0054


Harvard: Australian Style

Yan, J & Zhang, C & Li, T 2020, 'Dragon’s Abacus: Developmentalist Strategy and EconomicSocial Consequences of Chinese Companies in Africa', İstanbul University Journal of Sociology, vol. 40, no. 2, pp. 745-766, viewed 6 Jul. 2022, https://doi.org/10.26650/SJ.2020.40.2.0054


Harvard: Author-Date Style

Yan, J. and Zhang, C. and Li, T. (2020) ‘Dragon’s Abacus: Developmentalist Strategy and EconomicSocial Consequences of Chinese Companies in Africa’, İstanbul University Journal of Sociology, 40(2), pp. 745-766. https://doi.org/10.26650/SJ.2020.40.2.0054 (6 Jul. 2022).


MLA

Yan, Jun, and Chong Zhang and Tingting Li. Dragon’s Abacus: Developmentalist Strategy and EconomicSocial Consequences of Chinese Companies in Africa.” İstanbul University Journal of Sociology, vol. 40, no. 2, 2020, pp. 745-766. [Database Container], https://doi.org/10.26650/SJ.2020.40.2.0054


Vancouver

Yan J, Zhang C, Li T. Dragon’s Abacus: Developmentalist Strategy and EconomicSocial Consequences of Chinese Companies in Africa. İstanbul University Journal of Sociology [Internet]. 6 Jul. 2022 [cited 6 Jul. 2022];40(2):745-766. Available from: https://doi.org/10.26650/SJ.2020.40.2.0054 doi: 10.26650/SJ.2020.40.2.0054


ISNAD

Yan, Jun - Zhang, Chong - Li, Tingting. Dragon’s Abacus: Developmentalist Strategy and EconomicSocial Consequences of Chinese Companies in Africa”. İstanbul University Journal of Sociology 40/2 (Jul. 2022): 745-766. https://doi.org/10.26650/SJ.2020.40.2.0054



TIMELINE


Submitted13.06.2020
Accepted05.11.2020
Published Online31.12.2020

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