Research Article


DOI :10.26650/experimed.1381077   IUP :10.26650/experimed.1381077    Full Text (PDF)

Effect of MCP-1 and CCR2 Serum Levels on COVID-19 Severity

Selen Zeliha Mart KömürcüŞeydanur DoğanEbru KayaSevim YavaşSerkan DoğanUtku Murat KalafatHayriye Şentürk ÇiftçiSelçuk Daşdemir

Objective: Approximately 80% of people with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are asymptomatic, and only a small proportion of cases show serious consequences leading to hospitalization. The interplay between chemokines and their receptors can affect the severity of several infectious diseases, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome. The interplay of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) with its receptor C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) may affect the pathogenesis of COVID-19 by functioning in the dispatch of lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages to the infection site.

Materials and Methods: The serum MCP-1 and CCR2 concentrations were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 49 asymptomatic, 50 severe, and 57 critical COVID-19 cases.

Results: Serum MCP-1 levels were considerably higher in critical cases than in cases in the other two groups, suggesting an increased risk for disease severity (p = 0.008; p = 0.01, respectively). Serum CCR2 levels were significantly higher in asymptomatic cases than in critical cases suggesting a protective role against disease severity (p = 0.001).

Conclusion: MCP-1 and CCR2 may be candidate biomarkers for the prediction of disease severity. Therefore, by measuring serum levels of MCP-1 and CCR2 early, the disease course can be predicted , and necessary precautions can be taken before the disease becomes severe.


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APA

Mart Kömürcü, S.Z., Doğan, Ş., Kaya, E., Yavaş, S., Doğan, S., Kalafat, U.M., Şentürk Çiftçi, H., & Daşdemir, S. (2023). Effect of MCP-1 and CCR2 Serum Levels on COVID-19 Severity. Experimed, 13(3), 276-280. https://doi.org/10.26650/experimed.1381077


AMA

Mart Kömürcü S Z, Doğan Ş, Kaya E, Yavaş S, Doğan S, Kalafat U M, Şentürk Çiftçi H, Daşdemir S. Effect of MCP-1 and CCR2 Serum Levels on COVID-19 Severity. Experimed. 2023;13(3):276-280. https://doi.org/10.26650/experimed.1381077


ABNT

Mart Kömürcü, S.Z.; Doğan, Ş.; Kaya, E.; Yavaş, S.; Doğan, S.; Kalafat, U.M.; Şentürk Çiftçi, H.; Daşdemir, S. Effect of MCP-1 and CCR2 Serum Levels on COVID-19 Severity. Experimed, [Publisher Location], v. 13, n. 3, p. 276-280, 2023.


Chicago: Author-Date Style

Mart Kömürcü, Selen Zeliha, and Şeydanur Doğan and Ebru Kaya and Sevim Yavaş and Serkan Doğan and Utku Murat Kalafat and Hayriye Şentürk Çiftçi and Selçuk Daşdemir. 2023. “Effect of MCP-1 and CCR2 Serum Levels on COVID-19 Severity.” Experimed 13, no. 3: 276-280. https://doi.org/10.26650/experimed.1381077


Chicago: Humanities Style

Mart Kömürcü, Selen Zeliha, and Şeydanur Doğan and Ebru Kaya and Sevim Yavaş and Serkan Doğan and Utku Murat Kalafat and Hayriye Şentürk Çiftçi and Selçuk Daşdemir. Effect of MCP-1 and CCR2 Serum Levels on COVID-19 Severity.” Experimed 13, no. 3 (Mar. 2024): 276-280. https://doi.org/10.26650/experimed.1381077


Harvard: Australian Style

Mart Kömürcü, SZ & Doğan, Ş & Kaya, E & Yavaş, S & Doğan, S & Kalafat, UM & Şentürk Çiftçi, H & Daşdemir, S 2023, 'Effect of MCP-1 and CCR2 Serum Levels on COVID-19 Severity', Experimed, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 276-280, viewed 5 Mar. 2024, https://doi.org/10.26650/experimed.1381077


Harvard: Author-Date Style

Mart Kömürcü, S.Z. and Doğan, Ş. and Kaya, E. and Yavaş, S. and Doğan, S. and Kalafat, U.M. and Şentürk Çiftçi, H. and Daşdemir, S. (2023) ‘Effect of MCP-1 and CCR2 Serum Levels on COVID-19 Severity’, Experimed, 13(3), pp. 276-280. https://doi.org/10.26650/experimed.1381077 (5 Mar. 2024).


MLA

Mart Kömürcü, Selen Zeliha, and Şeydanur Doğan and Ebru Kaya and Sevim Yavaş and Serkan Doğan and Utku Murat Kalafat and Hayriye Şentürk Çiftçi and Selçuk Daşdemir. Effect of MCP-1 and CCR2 Serum Levels on COVID-19 Severity.” Experimed, vol. 13, no. 3, 2023, pp. 276-280. [Database Container], https://doi.org/10.26650/experimed.1381077


Vancouver

Mart Kömürcü SZ, Doğan Ş, Kaya E, Yavaş S, Doğan S, Kalafat UM, Şentürk Çiftçi H, Daşdemir S. Effect of MCP-1 and CCR2 Serum Levels on COVID-19 Severity. Experimed [Internet]. 5 Mar. 2024 [cited 5 Mar. 2024];13(3):276-280. Available from: https://doi.org/10.26650/experimed.1381077 doi: 10.26650/experimed.1381077


ISNAD

Mart Kömürcü, SelenZeliha - Doğan, Şeydanur - Kaya, Ebru - Yavaş, Sevim - Doğan, Serkan - Kalafat, UtkuMurat - Şentürk Çiftçi, Hayriye - Daşdemir, Selçuk. Effect of MCP-1 and CCR2 Serum Levels on COVID-19 Severity”. Experimed 13/3 (Mar. 2024): 276-280. https://doi.org/10.26650/experimed.1381077



TIMELINE


Submitted25.10.2023
Accepted29.11.2023
Published Online28.12.2023

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