Research Article


DOI :10.26650/JECS2021-1028137   IUP :10.26650/JECS2021-1028137    Full Text (PDF)

Digital Transnational Dissidence and State Control: A Conceptual Reflection on the Practice and Limits of Digital Transnationalism

Hüsrev TabakCenk Beyaz

The historical practice of citizen participation in politics was confined to elections, yet in the digital era, increasing digitalisation in everyday life has opened windows of opportunities for alternative civilian participation in the political processes, oppositionary activities being foremost among them. Individual or collective opposition parties thus today also confidently carry out political activities against governmental politics through cyber and digital spaces, and thanks to digital advances, oppositionary political participation can no longer be confined to national borders. Hence, in forms of digital transnationalism and transnational dissidence, irrespective of the connection of the articulator to the target country, people around the world criticise governmental politics and shape public perceptions in one country from abroad. Nevertheless, governments, as well, make use of digital space in taking part in transnational practices in both shaping domestic and international public opinion and challenging overseas or domestic dissident digital transnationalism with an aim to increase its control over the narrative of its politics. This paper elaborates on this paradoxical relationship – the nexus of digital transnationalism, transnational opposition and state control. The paper examines how and why cyberspace turns into a domain for transnational political opposition and, in a related way, examines state endeavours to regulate and govern digital areas as a means of overseeing the digital transnationalism of (trans)local and transnational dissidence groups. Particularly with reference to the latter, the paper deliberates on the limits of digital transnationalism against state control.


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APA

Tabak, H., & Beyaz, C. (2019). Digital Transnational Dissidence and State Control: A Conceptual Reflection on the Practice and Limits of Digital Transnationalism. Journal of Economy Culture and Society, 0(0), -. https://doi.org/10.26650/JECS2021-1028137


AMA

Tabak H, Beyaz C. Digital Transnational Dissidence and State Control: A Conceptual Reflection on the Practice and Limits of Digital Transnationalism. Journal of Economy Culture and Society. 2019;0(0):-. https://doi.org/10.26650/JECS2021-1028137


ABNT

Tabak, H.; Beyaz, C. Digital Transnational Dissidence and State Control: A Conceptual Reflection on the Practice and Limits of Digital Transnationalism. Journal of Economy Culture and Society, [Publisher Location], v. 0, n. 0, p. -, 2019.


Chicago: Author-Date Style

Tabak, Hüsrev, and Cenk Beyaz. 2019. “Digital Transnational Dissidence and State Control: A Conceptual Reflection on the Practice and Limits of Digital Transnationalism.” Journal of Economy Culture and Society 0, no. 0: -. https://doi.org/10.26650/JECS2021-1028137


Chicago: Humanities Style

Tabak, Hüsrev, and Cenk Beyaz. Digital Transnational Dissidence and State Control: A Conceptual Reflection on the Practice and Limits of Digital Transnationalism.” Journal of Economy Culture and Society 0, no. 0 (Dec. 2022): -. https://doi.org/10.26650/JECS2021-1028137


Harvard: Australian Style

Tabak, H & Beyaz, C 2019, 'Digital Transnational Dissidence and State Control: A Conceptual Reflection on the Practice and Limits of Digital Transnationalism', Journal of Economy Culture and Society, vol. 0, no. 0, pp. -, viewed 7 Dec. 2022, https://doi.org/10.26650/JECS2021-1028137


Harvard: Author-Date Style

Tabak, H. and Beyaz, C. (2019) ‘Digital Transnational Dissidence and State Control: A Conceptual Reflection on the Practice and Limits of Digital Transnationalism’, Journal of Economy Culture and Society, 0(0), pp. -. https://doi.org/10.26650/JECS2021-1028137 (7 Dec. 2022).


MLA

Tabak, Hüsrev, and Cenk Beyaz. Digital Transnational Dissidence and State Control: A Conceptual Reflection on the Practice and Limits of Digital Transnationalism.” Journal of Economy Culture and Society, vol. 0, no. 0, 2019, pp. -. [Database Container], https://doi.org/10.26650/JECS2021-1028137


Vancouver

Tabak H, Beyaz C. Digital Transnational Dissidence and State Control: A Conceptual Reflection on the Practice and Limits of Digital Transnationalism. Journal of Economy Culture and Society [Internet]. 7 Dec. 2022 [cited 7 Dec. 2022];0(0):-. Available from: https://doi.org/10.26650/JECS2021-1028137 doi: 10.26650/JECS2021-1028137


ISNAD

Tabak, Hüsrev - Beyaz, Cenk. Digital Transnational Dissidence and State Control: A Conceptual Reflection on the Practice and Limits of Digital Transnationalism”. Journal of Economy Culture and Society 0/0 (Dec. 2022): -. https://doi.org/10.26650/JECS2021-1028137



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Submitted28.11.2021
Accepted24.04.2022
Published Online21.09.2022

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