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DOI :10.26650/JPLC2021-930301   IUP :10.26650/JPLC2021-930301    Tam Metin (PDF)

Delinquent and Risk Behaviour among High School Students in a Canadian Prairie City: A Multivariate Analysis

Henry P. H. Chow

Drawing primarily on the concepts of self-control, differential association, and social bond, this paper explores delinquent and risk behaviour among high school students in a Canadian prairie city. A total of 262 students attending 14 high schools participated in a self-administered questionnaire survey. The results demonstrated that a notable number of students engaged in various risk (e.g., drinking, unprotected sex, and smoking) and delinquent (e.g., use of illegal substance, theft, and vandalism) behaviour. Multiple ordinary least-squares regression analysis revealed that males, older students, and those who had parents with a lower level of education, considered religion to be less important, scored lower on the self-control scale, indicated having more close friends who used illegal drugs, and reported having been a victim of violent or property crime were shown to have a greater likelihood of risk behaviour involvement. On the other hand, male respondents and those who scored lower on the self-control scale, associated with individuals who used illegal drugs, and reported having been a victim of violent or property crime were found to be significantly more likely to engage in delinquent behaviour. Policy implications of these results for institutional interventions are briefly discussed.


GENİŞLETİLMİŞ ÖZET


Drawing primarily on the concepts of self-control, differential association, and social bond, this paper explores delinquent and risk behaviour among high school students in a Canadian prairie city.

Data for this research were collected as part of a larger survey that was undertaken to explore adolescents’ criminal victimization, risk and delinquent behaviour, and attitudes toward the police among high school students in Regina, Saskatchewan. Using a snowball sampling method, a total of 262 students attending 14 high schools participated in a self-administered questionnaire survey. All procedures were adhered to standards set forth by the Research Ethics Board of the University of Regina. Each participant was provided with a copy of an introductory letter outlining the objectives of the study and how the information gathered would be used. It also emphasized that participation was voluntary and that all information obtained would remain confidential and anonymous.  

The results demonstrated that a notable number of students engaged in various risk and delinquent behaviour. Specifically, an overwhelming majority of the respondents (n = 222, 84.7%) reported having consumed alcohol. Three in ten (n = 78, 29.8%) indicated that they had engaged in unprotected sex and about a quarter reported having gambled (n = 63, 24.0%) or smoked (n = 67, 25.7%). Only a relatively small number of respondents had purchased a lottery ticket (n = 44, 16.7%) or taken part in a physical fight (n = 44, 16.8%). Concerning delinquent behaviour, two-fifths of the respondents (n = 110, 41.8%) indicated that they had used marijuana (n = 110, 41.8%). Nearly one in three admitted to having vandalized (i.e., having banged up or damaged something on purpose that did not belong to them) (n = 80, 30.8%). About a quarter indicated that they had committed a theft (i.e., having taken things worth $50 or less that did not belong to them) (n = 73, 28.1%) or operated a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (n = 61, 23.3%) or drugs (n = 54, 20.6%). Approximately one-fifth reported having taken a car for a ride without the owner’s permission (n = 59, 22.5%) or beaten up another person or hurt another person on purpose (n = 51, 19.5%). Relatively few respondents have committed breaking and entering (i.e., having broken into a locked building other than their homes) (n = 34, 13.0%), sold drugs (n = 26, 10.0%), carried a weapon on school property (n = 25, 9.6%), or taken part in a gang fight (n = 19, 7.3%).

Multiple ordinary least-squares regression analysis revealed that males, older students, and those who had parents with a lower level of education, considered religion to be less important, scored lower on the self-control scale, indicated having more close friends who used illegal drugs, and reported having been a victim of violent or property crime were shown to have a greater likelihood of risk behaviour involvement. On the other hand, male respondents and those who scored lower on the self-control scale, associated with individuals who used illegal drugs, and reported having been a victim of violent or property crime were found to be more likely to engage in delinquent behaviour.

Using a multivariate approach, this study explores the prevalence of adolescent risk and delinquent behaviour in a sample of high school students. It fills a lacuna in the literature on youth problem behaviour in Canada, and provides important insight into the major determinants of adolescents’ risk and delinquent involvement. The findings have significant policy and practical implications for individuals (e.g., school administrators, teachers, counsellors, social workers, and law enforcement officers) and agencies (e.g., boards of education, educational institutions, community organizations, governmental agencies) working with young people in various capacities. The results may be used to develop prevention and intervention strategies for delinquent and related behaviour. Given the strong link between delinquent peer association and likelihood of delinquent activity involvement, it is essential to develop pertinent policies and procedures to effectively screen and monitor adolescents for close ties with peers who engage in unlawful and analogous behaviour. The substantial impact of self-control on both risk and delinquent behaviour underscores the importance of strengthening adolescents’ self-regulation skills. In view of the close connection between criminal victimization experiences and likelihood of problem behaviour engagement, criminal justice agencies must make a concerted effort to reduce the criminal victimization risks among young people. As well, since criminal victimizations may have serious emotional, physical, psychological, and financial consequences, victim service organizations and schools should provide practical help and support to youth crime victims and to assist them in their recovery.

The findings of the present investigation should be considered in light of several methodological limitations. As this study reports data based on a non-random sample of high school students in a Canadian prairie city, caution must be exercised in interpreting the results. The reliance on cross-sectional data precludes interpretation of causality. Although respondents were assured complete confidentiality and anonymity, bias stemming from self-report and social desirability might have influenced the results. Further exploration of variation across types of both institutions (e.g., private vs. public and religious vs. non-religious schools), students (e.g., majority vs. racial, ethnic, and minority groups), and geographic locations (e.g., rural vs. urban) would be informative. The use of a longitudinal design to ascertain the causality of the study variables would also be warranted. 


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DIŞA AKTAR



APA

Chow, H.P. (2021). Delinquent and Risk Behaviour among High School Students in a Canadian Prairie City: A Multivariate Analysis. Ceza Hukuku ve Kriminoloji Dergisi, 9(2), 317-339. https://doi.org/10.26650/JPLC2021-930301


AMA

Chow H P. Delinquent and Risk Behaviour among High School Students in a Canadian Prairie City: A Multivariate Analysis. Ceza Hukuku ve Kriminoloji Dergisi. 2021;9(2):317-339. https://doi.org/10.26650/JPLC2021-930301


ABNT

Chow, H.P. Delinquent and Risk Behaviour among High School Students in a Canadian Prairie City: A Multivariate Analysis. Ceza Hukuku ve Kriminoloji Dergisi, [Publisher Location], v. 9, n. 2, p. 317-339, 2021.


Chicago: Author-Date Style

Chow, Henry P. H.,. 2021. “Delinquent and Risk Behaviour among High School Students in a Canadian Prairie City: A Multivariate Analysis.” Ceza Hukuku ve Kriminoloji Dergisi 9, no. 2: 317-339. https://doi.org/10.26650/JPLC2021-930301


Chicago: Humanities Style

Chow, Henry P. H.,. Delinquent and Risk Behaviour among High School Students in a Canadian Prairie City: A Multivariate Analysis.” Ceza Hukuku ve Kriminoloji Dergisi 9, no. 2 (Jul. 2024): 317-339. https://doi.org/10.26650/JPLC2021-930301


Harvard: Australian Style

Chow, HP 2021, 'Delinquent and Risk Behaviour among High School Students in a Canadian Prairie City: A Multivariate Analysis', Ceza Hukuku ve Kriminoloji Dergisi, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 317-339, viewed 14 Jul. 2024, https://doi.org/10.26650/JPLC2021-930301


Harvard: Author-Date Style

Chow, H.P. (2021) ‘Delinquent and Risk Behaviour among High School Students in a Canadian Prairie City: A Multivariate Analysis’, Ceza Hukuku ve Kriminoloji Dergisi, 9(2), pp. 317-339. https://doi.org/10.26650/JPLC2021-930301 (14 Jul. 2024).


MLA

Chow, Henry P. H.,. Delinquent and Risk Behaviour among High School Students in a Canadian Prairie City: A Multivariate Analysis.” Ceza Hukuku ve Kriminoloji Dergisi, vol. 9, no. 2, 2021, pp. 317-339. [Database Container], https://doi.org/10.26650/JPLC2021-930301


Vancouver

Chow HP. Delinquent and Risk Behaviour among High School Students in a Canadian Prairie City: A Multivariate Analysis. Ceza Hukuku ve Kriminoloji Dergisi [Internet]. 14 Jul. 2024 [cited 14 Jul. 2024];9(2):317-339. Available from: https://doi.org/10.26650/JPLC2021-930301 doi: 10.26650/JPLC2021-930301


ISNAD

Chow, HenryP. H.. Delinquent and Risk Behaviour among High School Students in a Canadian Prairie City: A Multivariate Analysis”. Ceza Hukuku ve Kriminoloji Dergisi 9/2 (Jul. 2024): 317-339. https://doi.org/10.26650/JPLC2021-930301



ZAMAN ÇİZELGESİ


Gönderim01.05.2021
Kabul27.07.2021
Çevrimiçi Yayınlanma20.10.2021

LİSANS


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